August 16, 2023

Initio Cell Expands European Footprint with Leading Organ-on-a-Chip Lab in the Netherlands

Advancing drug development and diagnostics globally in collaboration with the Dutch life sciences ecosystem.

Türkiye-based Initio Cell is expanding its work on microphysiological systems with a new lab in Leiden, the Netherlands. Located at the Leiden Bioscience Park, the fully equipped biological safety lab (BSL2) will allow the company to grow R&D and contract research organization (CRO) services focused on its original organ-on-chip devices.

Dedicated to making a difference in world health by developing patented, multi-functional organ-on-a-chip devices and tests for drug discovery, Initio Cell is helping advance drug development and diagnostics globally.

Fertile ground for regenerative medicine and personalized patient care

The Netherlands’ high concentration of world-leading researchers, business-oriented R&D facilities, and supportive government make the country an ideal base for companies focused on solving global life sciences and healthcare issues and treating patients around the world.

“We always had the intention to grow in Europe and had the Netherlands in sight because the Dutch MPS ecosystem is very active both academically and industry-wise,” said Aydın Öztunali, CEO and co-founder of Initio Cell.

“We visited various science parks in different countries, and the Leiden Bioscience Park was by far the best. The infrastructure and close collaboration with academia was present, all companies were in compatible life science fields, and maybe the most important was the people factor. The Leiden Bioscience Park administration is there to help us grow with a sincerely friendly and resourceful attitude.”

Boasting secure connections between the private sector, government, academia, and patients, the Dutch “quadruple helix” approach provides businesses like Initio Cell with the right environment for innovation in R&D.

Revolutionizing the field of drug discovery

At the forefront of transforming the pharmaceutical industry, Initio Cell’s organ-on-chip tech has the potential to successfully mimic in-vivo conditions, allowing for functional cellular phenotyping and advancing precision medicine. With this technology, it’s possible to create microenvironments resembling various tissues.

When it comes to diagnosis and treatment advancements, the Netherlands has solidified its position as a leader in life sciences and health and research and development. With public-private partnerships, such as the Institute for Human Organ and Disease Model Technologies (hDMT) and Regenerative Medicine Crossing Borders (RegmedXB), the Netherlands is paving the way in the Organs-on-a-Chip field. Recent investments in these public-private partnerships by the National Growth Fund and Dutch Research Council (NWO) stimulate developments, such as the Organs-on-a-Chip pilot line, NXTgen High Tech and the Organ-on-Chip Development Center, even further.

Embracing a hands-on approach and a culture of innovation, Dutch researchers and medical professionals are collaborating with companies to advance precision medicine. Leveraging health data to curate innovative treatment regimens, the Netherlands is committed to driving medical progress and improving patient outcomes. The country’s highly skilled workforce and attractive R&D incentives support businesses that call the Netherlands home.

“From our first contact with the NFIA Istanbul office, the staff provided extensive and very insightful information to us about potential customers, science parks to relocate, legal and financial issues. The NFIA facilitated an amazing fact-finding trip to the Netherlands within a couple of months after we connected. This fact-finding trip which included meetings with potential customers and collaborative institutions, immensely helped us to finalize our decision to move to the Netherlands, and the support continues,” shared Aydın Öztunali, CEO and co-founder of Initio Cell.

 Source: InnovationQuarter, part of the Invest in Holland network
Did you know? More than 18,000 students attend study programmes at Leiden Bio Science Park